Call for Chapters: Book Project on Internationalization of Cities

I will be co-editing a book, tentatively entitled From Branding to Diplomacy: Cities in the International Arena,  with Sohaela Amiri of Pardee RAND Graduate School on the internationalization of cities.

One of the areas I wanted to expand on as part of my research on  cities and communication  has been how cities – our homes – have been spending time and resources to be active in the ‘outside’ world. Let that be through city diplomacy or city diplomacy, our hometowns now have new identities. We are looking for chapters that investigates these new identities, the new roles and functions undertaking by cities, and the ways to study them.

Below, you can find a more formal call (or download the call in PDF format here).

Feel free to contact me if you have any questions. Deadline for abstract submission is November 1st.

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Concrete Jungle: The Urbanization Fad

“In this Concrete Jungle
We make our homes in city walls
You know we gotta run so wild
To keep up with this life style” Au/Ra – Concrete Jungle

This post is one of my initial attempts to structure my thoughts and (mostly anecdotal) observations about urbanizations into a research plan.

I have been writing about city branding – or in other words how cities see themselves, portray themselves, and are perceived by others – for the better part of the last decade. During the last two years, I started experimenting with the idea of focusing on the attempts of smaller towns that project an urban identity. After accepting a job in Waleska, GA – a town of less than 900 people – and moving to Woodstock, GA – the lively urban center in Cherokee County as it houses around 25,000 people and 20 restaurants/bars -, I am even more excited about the project.

I have one burning question – why do we want to live in this concrete jungle? Why are we so obsessed with cities? More importantly, why do smaller (or exurban or suburban) places act like urban centers?

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Downtown Woodstock, its residents, and one of the few sidewalks in the entire region.

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